theories-of:

Louise Lawler Chandelier 

theories-of:

Louise Lawler Chandelier 

explore-blog:

Rachel Sussman’s photographs of the oldest living things in the world – a masterpiece at the intersection of art, science, and philosophy.

With an artist’s gift for “aesthetic force” and a scientist’s rigorous respect for truth, Sussman straddles a multitude of worlds as she travels across space and time to unearth Earth’s greatest stories of resilience, stories of tragedy and triumph, past and future, but above all stories that humble our human lives, which seem like the blink of a cosmic eye against the timescales of these ancient organisms — organisms that have unflinchingly witnessed all of our own tragedies and triumphs, our wars and our revolutions, our holocausts and our renaissances, and have remained anchored to existence more firmly than we can ever hope to be.
Above all, however, the project raises questions that aren’t so much scientific or artistic as profoundly human: What is the meaning of human life if it comes and goes before a patch of moss has reached the end of infancy? How do our petty daily stresses measure up against a struggle for survival stretching back millennia? Who would we be if we relinquished our arrogant conviction that we are Earth’s biological crown jewel?

See more here.
http://www.brainpickings.org/index.php/2014/04/14/the-oldest-living-things-in-the-world-rachel-sussman-book/

explore-blog:

Rachel Sussman’s photographs of the oldest living things in the world – a masterpiece at the intersection of art, science, and philosophy.

With an artist’s gift for “aesthetic force” and a scientist’s rigorous respect for truth, Sussman straddles a multitude of worlds as she travels across space and time to unearth Earth’s greatest stories of resilience, stories of tragedy and triumph, past and future, but above all stories that humble our human lives, which seem like the blink of a cosmic eye against the timescales of these ancient organisms — organisms that have unflinchingly witnessed all of our own tragedies and triumphs, our wars and our revolutions, our holocausts and our renaissances, and have remained anchored to existence more firmly than we can ever hope to be.

Above all, however, the project raises questions that aren’t so much scientific or artistic as profoundly human: What is the meaning of human life if it comes and goes before a patch of moss has reached the end of infancy? How do our petty daily stresses measure up against a struggle for survival stretching back millennia? Who would we be if we relinquished our arrogant conviction that we are Earth’s biological crown jewel?

See more here.

thomasprior:

velvet ropes

thomasprior:

velvet ropes

1000scientists:

Bobby ScheidemannFrom the series Left Down Right Up

1000scientists:

Bobby ScheidemannFrom the series Left Down Right Up

1000scientists:

Bobby ScheidemannFrom the series Left Down Right Up

1000scientists:

Bobby ScheidemannFrom the series Left Down Right Up

1000scientists:

Bobby ScheidemannFrom the series Left Down Right Up

1000scientists:

Bobby ScheidemannFrom the series Left Down Right Up

1000scientists:

Bobby Scheidemann
From the series Left Down Right Up

jesuisperdu:

bryson rand

jesuisperdu:

bryson rand

charlmalan:

John Cage, Global Village 37 - 48, 1989
http://gillianthompson.wordpress.com/2012/11/01/john-cage/

charlmalan:

John Cage, Global Village 37 - 48, 1989

(via dellpesce)

Installation picture of Picture of Month for March by Kalee Appleton.
See the new archive of received gift photos.
Get the Picture of the month for April (for free). 
Send me yours and I will post it too.

Installation picture of Picture of Month for March by Kalee Appleton.

See the new archive of received gift photos.

Get the Picture of the month for April (for free).

Send me yours and I will post it too.

shanetolbert:

untitled, 2014, 20” x 14”, acrylic on canvas

shanetolbert:

untitled, 2014, 20” x 14”, acrylic on canvas

Do Recordings Kill Music?

newyorker:

Sasha Frere-Jones and the musician and writer David Grubbs discuss Grubbs’s new book, “Records Ruin the Landscape,” and how recordings alter, enhance, or distort the experience of live performance: http://nyr.kr/1gHH6mp

Photograph of John Cage by Herve Gloaguen/Gamma-Rapho/Getty.

(Source: newyorker.com)

prostheticknowledge:

Paracosm 3D
App for next-generation depth-sensor smartphones that makes 3D scanning a collaborative process - video embedded below:


The future of 3D scanning is that we’ll all be able to do it together! Check out this demo by Paracosm of the Google ATAP Labs Project Tango phones. Paracosm and Google Labs have been working side by side to create the technology to make collaborative scanning possible.

You can find out more (and see an interactive WebGL demo of the above data capture) at the Paracosm website here
This is in the direction of how I expect this tech to create a new methodology in photography, “Collaborative Photography”, where authorship is shared and captures are synced. Think of it this way - imagine the group-selfie requiring not one single camera, but several at exactly the same time, with devices communicating to each other sharing their data together to produce the final ‘shot’.

prostheticknowledge:

Paracosm 3D
App for next-generation depth-sensor smartphones that makes 3D scanning a collaborative process - video embedded below:


The future of 3D scanning is that we’ll all be able to do it together! Check out this demo by Paracosm of the Google ATAP Labs Project Tango phones. Paracosm and Google Labs have been working side by side to create the technology to make collaborative scanning possible.

You can find out more (and see an interactive WebGL demo of the above data capture) at the Paracosm website here
This is in the direction of how I expect this tech to create a new methodology in photography, “Collaborative Photography”, where authorship is shared and captures are synced. Think of it this way - imagine the group-selfie requiring not one single camera, but several at exactly the same time, with devices communicating to each other sharing their data together to produce the final ‘shot’.

prostheticknowledge:

Paracosm 3D
App for next-generation depth-sensor smartphones that makes 3D scanning a collaborative process - video embedded below:


The future of 3D scanning is that we’ll all be able to do it together! Check out this demo by Paracosm of the Google ATAP Labs Project Tango phones. Paracosm and Google Labs have been working side by side to create the technology to make collaborative scanning possible.

You can find out more (and see an interactive WebGL demo of the above data capture) at the Paracosm website here
This is in the direction of how I expect this tech to create a new methodology in photography, “Collaborative Photography”, where authorship is shared and captures are synced. Think of it this way - imagine the group-selfie requiring not one single camera, but several at exactly the same time, with devices communicating to each other sharing their data together to produce the final ‘shot’.

prostheticknowledge:

Paracosm 3D
App for next-generation depth-sensor smartphones that makes 3D scanning a collaborative process - video embedded below:


The future of 3D scanning is that we’ll all be able to do it together! Check out this demo by Paracosm of the Google ATAP Labs Project Tango phones. Paracosm and Google Labs have been working side by side to create the technology to make collaborative scanning possible.

You can find out more (and see an interactive WebGL demo of the above data capture) at the Paracosm website here
This is in the direction of how I expect this tech to create a new methodology in photography, “Collaborative Photography”, where authorship is shared and captures are synced. Think of it this way - imagine the group-selfie requiring not one single camera, but several at exactly the same time, with devices communicating to each other sharing their data together to produce the final ‘shot’.

prostheticknowledge:

Paracosm 3D

App for next-generation depth-sensor smartphones that makes 3D scanning a collaborative process - video embedded below:

The future of 3D scanning is that we’ll all be able to do it together! Check out this demo by Paracosm of the Google ATAP Labs Project Tango phones. Paracosm and Google Labs have been working side by side to create the technology to make collaborative scanning possible.

You can find out more (and see an interactive WebGL demo of the above data capture) at the Paracosm website here

This is in the direction of how I expect this tech to create a new methodology in photography, “Collaborative Photography”, where authorship is shared and captures are synced. Think of it this way - imagine the group-selfie requiring not one single camera, but several at exactly the same time, with devices communicating to each other sharing their data together to produce the final ‘shot’.

Picture of the month club for April, Peter Pan, 2013
Download your 5x7 inch hi rez file for free here.

Picture of the month club for April, Peter Pan, 2013

Download your 5x7 inch hi rez file for free here.

lareviewofbooks:


One of the biggest challenges of fabulist writing — at least fabulist writing that aspires to the kind of ontological and ethical complexity of Bender’s work — is getting the reader to ask the right questions. When she tells you that a sleepless woman would open the door to greet the mailman who handed her “a basket of seawater, dripping, with stamps floating wetly on top” you’re too caught up in the beauty of the image not to believe her. You buy it, at first glance, simply because it’s so well written. But by definition, fairy tales are built on a metaphorical truth that operates in place of a literal truth, and since the metaphor is the plot, we need to ask why — why seawater? Why the postman? What is the vehicle and what the tenor? How is our reality refracted in this reality? The demand the fairy tale makes is not just that we look more closely at the ordinary, see it from a new and unexpected angle, but that we confront the archetypes we live by. The question we are forced to ask, forced by Bender’s knack for original metaphor by her A.M. Homes­–like directness, by her ability to make us believe the unbelievable, is why we believe at all.

Erika Recordon and fairy tales and believing the unbelievable in Aimee Bender’s latest short story collection, The Color Master.
Plus, check out this exclusive LARB interview with Aimee Bender and Editor in Chief Tom Lutz!

lareviewofbooks:


One of the biggest challenges of fabulist writing — at least fabulist writing that aspires to the kind of ontological and ethical complexity of Bender’s work — is getting the reader to ask the right questions. When she tells you that a sleepless woman would open the door to greet the mailman who handed her “a basket of seawater, dripping, with stamps floating wetly on top” you’re too caught up in the beauty of the image not to believe her. You buy it, at first glance, simply because it’s so well written. But by definition, fairy tales are built on a metaphorical truth that operates in place of a literal truth, and since the metaphor is the plot, we need to ask why — why seawater? Why the postman? What is the vehicle and what the tenor? How is our reality refracted in this reality? The demand the fairy tale makes is not just that we look more closely at the ordinary, see it from a new and unexpected angle, but that we confront the archetypes we live by. The question we are forced to ask, forced by Bender’s knack for original metaphor by her A.M. Homes­–like directness, by her ability to make us believe the unbelievable, is why we believe at all.

Erika Recordon and fairy tales and believing the unbelievable in Aimee Bender’s latest short story collection, The Color Master.
Plus, check out this exclusive LARB interview with Aimee Bender and Editor in Chief Tom Lutz!

lareviewofbooks:

One of the biggest challenges of fabulist writing — at least fabulist writing that aspires to the kind of ontological and ethical complexity of Bender’s work — is getting the reader to ask the right questions. When she tells you that a sleepless woman would open the door to greet the mailman who handed her “a basket of seawater, dripping, with stamps floating wetly on top” you’re too caught up in the beauty of the image not to believe her. You buy it, at first glance, simply because it’s so well written. But by definition, fairy tales are built on a metaphorical truth that operates in place of a literal truth, and since the metaphor is the plot, we need to ask why — why seawater? Why the postman? What is the vehicle and what the tenor? How is our reality refracted in this reality? The demand the fairy tale makes is not just that we look more closely at the ordinary, see it from a new and unexpected angle, but that we confront the archetypes we live by. The question we are forced to ask, forced by Bender’s knack for original metaphor by her A.M. Homes­–like directness, by her ability to make us believe the unbelievable, is why we believe at all.

Erika Recordon and fairy tales and believing the unbelievable in Aimee Bender’s latest short story collection, The Color Master.

Plus, check out this exclusive LARB interview with Aimee Bender and Editor in Chief Tom Lutz!

HUM via Barry Stone via time-and-space.tv/http://www.time-and-space.tv/contributors/barry-stone/post/hum

HUM via Barry Stone via time-and-space.tv/

wowgreat:

Bridget Riley - Tremor, 1961




http://www.flickr.com/photos/de_buurman/8125268882/

wowgreat:

Bridget Riley - Tremor, 1961

(Source: weissesrauschen, via wowgreat)

brendenfreedman:

Cassette release and performance of Hum, March 1, 2014

Brenden Freedman’s documentation of the event.

brendenfreedman:

Cassette release and performance of Hum, March 1, 2014

Brenden Freedman’s documentation of the event.

brendenfreedman:

Cassette release and performance of Hum, March 1, 2014

Brenden Freedman’s documentation of the event.

brendenfreedman:

Cassette release and performance of Hum, March 1, 2014

Brenden Freedman’s documentation of the event.

brendenfreedman:

Cassette release and performance of Hum, March 1, 2014

Brenden Freedman’s documentation of the event.

brendenfreedman:

Cassette release and performance of Hum, March 1, 2014

Brenden Freedman’s documentation of the event.

brendenfreedman:

Cassette release and performance of Hum, March 1, 2014

Brenden Freedman’s documentation of the event.